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NYPD Arrest Rapper Chucky73 for Kosciuszko Bridge Shutdown

Adel Mejia, also known as Chucky73, has been arrested for reckless endangerment following an incident that led to the shutdown of traffic on the Kosciuszko Bridge

Jan. 11, 2022 By Christian Murray

The police have arrested the well-known rapper Chucky73 for allegedly taking part in a party that shut down the Kosciuszko Bridge in November.

Adel Mejia, also known as Chucky73, was arrested by officers from the NYPD108 Police Precinct this morning for reckless endangerment and other charges, sources said.

His arrest stems from a high-profile bridge shutdown when about a dozen men got out of their cars at around 6 p.m. on Nov. 14 and started rapping to loud music while filming themselves. Some of the cars were doing doughnuts, while blocking traffic.

Video of the incident shows traffic brought to a complete halt.

The incident sparked outrage at the time.

“You know, unfortunately, there’s no shortage of idiots these days and blocking a bridge and the inconvenience and the potential danger it can cause to me is reckless at the minimum,” former Police Commissioner Dermot Shea told NY1 following the incident.

Eric Adams took to twitter at the time to condemn the incident.

“Incidents like this damage our brand as a city, disrespect New Yorkers and endanger visitors and residents alike.”

The 108 Police detective squad conducted the investigation.

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