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New York City is ‘$9 Billion in the Hole,’ Mayor Says

Mayor Bill de Blasio said the city is predicted to lose $9 billion in tax revenue between the remainder of this fiscal year and next (Michael Appleton/ Mayoral Photography Office)

May 27, 2020 By Allie Griffin

New York City faces a whopping $9 billion deficit due to the economic fallout of the coronavirus, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced today.

The budget hole was originally estimated to be around $7.4 billion through to June 30, 2021 — but has widened by another $1.6 billion, the mayor said.

“We are now $9 billion in the hole between the current fiscal year and the one that begins July 1,” de Blasio said at City Hall.

The city’s fiscal year begins July 1 and the city council and mayor must pass a 2021 budget by the end of June.

The city is on a time crunch to either make additional budget cuts or find others sources of funds– such as tapping into its reserves or borrowing money. All options are on the table.

“There is literally no way we can solve this problem without federal help or without having to make very very painful choices that will affect the quality of life in this city, our ability to provide basic services and how many people we’re able to employ,” de Blasio said.

He warned that without federal help, the loss of revenue would continue into the next fiscal year and beyond.

An economic relief package that would provide $17.2 billion to New York City has passed the House of Representatives — but has met fierce resistance from the Republican-controlled Senate.

De Blasio urged Congress to pass the package of bills named the HEROES Act.

However, if the federal government doesn’t provide relief, he said New York City could borrow the funds as a last resort.

He is calling on the state to grant the city borrowing power as a “safety net.”

“It’s not something we want to use or intend to use in the first instance,” he said. “But it’s something we need as a last resort if our federal government isn’t there for us.”

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Jasmine Perez

Keep giving away money to every ILLEGAL IMMIGRANT and Welfare Queen who raises their hand then wonder why we have overcrowding and underfunding. This is simple math not rocket science.

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Jon

De Blaseo blaming the City’s 9 billion deficit on the virus is certainly a joke on all of us. NYC has been mismanaged for years with corrupt politicians and moneys misspent. If there was a crime for ineptness, De Blaseo should and must be prosecuted,

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Larry Penner

Mayor Bill de Blasio reminds me of J. Wellington Wimpy who famously said “I’ll gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today.” TANSTAAFL – There ain’t no such thing as a free lunch or all the goodies promised by de Blasio over the past six plus years of his administration. He increased spending by $20 billion over the past six years and increased the city payroll by 30,000 under his watch. He never put aside any real money for a rainy day or economic downturn. The private sector and citizens make difficult financial decisions on how to use existing resources. New Yorkers prioritize their own family budgets. They make the hard choices in how existing household financial resources will be spent. If it can wait until later, it should be postponed till next year. City Hall must do the same. Mayor de Blasio should lead by example and take a pay cut. So too, should his commissioners, deputy commissioners along with any of his managers making above $125,000. Millions of New Yorkers manage to survive on salaries less than $100,000 annually.
Larry Penner

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