You are reading

City Aids 139 Homeless People Found on the Subway Last Night

A homeless person sleeps on the E train (Wikimedia Commons/ Jess Hawsor / CC BY-SA)

May 6, 2020 By Allie Griffin

City workers convinced 139 homeless New Yorkers sleeping in subway cars and stations last night to take refuge at city shelters.

NYPD and MTA officers, along with outreach workers, found 242 homeless people in the subways and stations when trains were closed early this morning from 1 a.m. to 5 a.m. Each was offered assistance in finding a bed and 139 took the offer.

Mayor Bill de Blasio praised the success of the outreach effort on the first morning of the new nightly closures during the coronavirus pandemic.

“More than half of the people encountered and engaged, agreed to leave the subways, to leave the streets and come in and that’s an amazing reality to begin with,” de Blasio said.

The 139 people have been moved into safe havens and congregant shelters, he said.

Governor Andrew Cuomo and the mayor announced last week that subway service would end each day from 1 a.m. to 5 a.m. so cleaning crews can disinfect each subway car and station amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Many elected officials have complained that homeless New Yorkers have taken over the subways as ridership has dramatically reduced with people staying home during the health crisis.

The overnight shutdown means all New Yorkers, including the homeless, must vacate the subways and stations during the specified hours.

Social Services Commissioner Steven Banks did note, however, that some of the homeless people they helped last night will return to the subway.

“Some people may return, but we’ll be back every night, offering that helping hand to bring them off the streets,” Banks said.

email the author: [email protected]

One Comment

Click for Comments 
paul

Good, now keep it up. It should have started day one in the Deblassio administration.
Also:

1-Make sure the subway homeless don’t end up homeless on the street. There are encampments at every major intersection in NYC. NYC resembles more of a third world country or a city in the middle age than a modern city. This type of neglect are signs of a city in deep decline.

2-Free up funds instead of giving billionaire RE developers tax breaks to provide secure livable shelters for the homeless.

Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

BP launches new advisory panel for youth to become civically engaged in the future of Queens

In an effort to get more young people involved in civics, Queens Borough President Donovan Richards has created a new advisory panel known as the Youth and Young Adult Council to introduce the “youngest and fiercest” community advocates to both community service and organization.

Members of the advisory body will advocate concerns through means of community engagement by participating in one of two cohorts. The first will be made up of high school representatives between the ages of 13 and 17, while the second cohort will be comprised of young adults between the ages of 18 and 25.

Brooklyn Academy of Music to spotlight art, activism, and voting rights at MLK Day tribute Jan. 16

The Brooklyn Academy of Music will memorialize Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with weekend of events leading up to the 37th annual MLK Tribute on Monday, Jan. 16.

The main event takes place on Monday when BAM staff, Brooklyn Borough President Antonio Reynoso, civic leaders and community members will join together to hear a keynote speech from civil rights lawyer and law professor Sherrilyn Ifill and enjoy performances from Sing Harlem and Allison Russell.